Warm Day

May 13, 2019 - Comment

Warm Day Image by Jason A. Samfield Best if viewed in LARGE. P.S. It is amazing to watch a forest grow through the change of the seasons. At first, the undergrowth pictured here grows with tremendous speed and vitality; And then, the trees begin to sprout their thick foliage as the day lengthens which provides

Warm Day
l survival rate
Image by Jason A. Samfield
Best if viewed in LARGE.

P.S. It is amazing to watch a forest grow through the change of the seasons. At first, the undergrowth pictured here grows with tremendous speed and vitality; And then, the trees begin to sprout their thick foliage as the day lengthens which provides great shade for us mammals, but restricts the light for the undergrowth. The annuals in the undergrowth die off after they flower and form seeds to revitalize the next season with their offspring. The organic matter and waste is left in a pile of unyielding debris. So then, the insects and amphibians, reptiles and every small species prospers by eating the organic matter. The seeds provide food for the birds, the small insects take sugars from the stems, and the caterpillars eat the leaves. As the populations and strength of the smaller things swell as they feast on a buffet, then the larger species emerge to eat the smaller. Well fed prey become easy targets for the predators who find delight in an ample supply of critters. At present, I walked the nature trail and the debris is widespread, the trees are shady, and the insects are numerous. I ran into a few wild spiders larger than any that I have ever seen before. They were nearly the size of a tarantula. I believe that they were female spiders brimming with anticipation of providing a good web for their new ones on the way. I saw sunflower plants as tall as me and then I turned the corner and saw purple thistle plants much taller than me with stems the size of small tree trunks. Sunflower plants as tall as 10 ft. (~3 m) and thistle plants nearly 8 ft. (~2.5 m) with stem circumferences of equal size or larger than my wrists. The cicadas were creating an enormous noise, almost a deafening roar of insectoid infestation. The wildlife abounds. It is as if the ground was thirsty plagued with the droughts of times past and the recent rain relief ran round the circle of life and every seed, every plant gave birth to a season of splendor and continuing life as it were before the days of desertification. I can only sense the larger species of mice and raccoons, of deer and hawks, growing, contemplating life as best as they can do since their superabundance of food is present. This spring, this season, this period of regrowth and has shown to me that evolution is evil in its cruelty, but in the most passive aggressive way; And that the serendipity of survival is surreal. The constant change of the landscape is palatable to even the least observant. It is impossible to ignore the Godliness, the supreme equation at work, the matter of fact about our world that allows for living and dying to occur. It is splendidly obvious to me, almost in a self-evident style. It is amazingly complex, cruel in the approach, easily apparent to the bystanders, and ever increasing in the spirit of competition, the freedom of ideas at the ultimate marketplace, the lucidity of luck permeating the still living, and the avid assertiveness necessary to ascertain the needed attributes to make the long ascent of survival, the chain of species ever-evolving, progressing and regressing at phenomenal rates of speed and interesting rates of slow momentum, almost frozen in time. It is the definition of the word awesome.

Comments

Leave a Reply