The South Fork of the San Joaquin River drops into a narrow…

July 14, 2019 - Comment

The South Fork of the San Joaquin River drops into a narrow canyon with a series of spectacular water falls and cold, emerald pools. Goddard Canyon, Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Parks, SEKI, Sierra Nevada Mountains, USA. Photo b… The Wilderness Journals [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JMF0NrjNTvQ?rel=0&w=425&h=355] This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Oregon Trail Listening is

The South Fork of the San Joaquin River drops into a narrow canyon with a series of spectacular water falls and cold, emerald pools. Goddard Canyon, Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Parks, SEKI, Sierra Nevada Mountains, USA. Photo b…
The Wilderness Journals
[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JMF0NrjNTvQ?rel=0&w=425&h=355]

This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article:
Oregon Trail

Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago.

Learning by listening is a great way to:
– increases imagination and understanding
– improves your listening skills
– improves your own spoken accent
– learn while on the move
– reduce eye strain

Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone.

You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ

You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through:
https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts

“The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing.”
– Socrates

SUMMARY
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The Oregon Trail is a 2,170-mile (3,490 km) historic East–West, large-wheeled wagon route and emigrant trail in the United States that connected the Missouri River to valleys in Oregon. The eastern part of the Oregon Trail spanned part of the future state of Kansas, and nearly all of what are now the states of Nebraska and Wyoming. The western half of the trail spanned most of the future states of Idaho and Oregon.
The Oregon Trail was laid by fur traders and traders from about 1811 to 1840, and was only passable on foot or by horseback. By 1836, when the first migrant wagon train was organized in Independence, Missouri, a wagon trail had been cleared to Fort Hall, Idaho. Wagon trails were cleared increasingly farther west, and eventually reached all the way to the Willamette Valley in Oregon, at which point what came to be called the Oregon Trail was complete, even as almost annual improvements were made in the form of bridges, cutoffs, ferries, and roads, which made the trip faster and safer. From various starting points in Iowa, Missouri, or Nebraska Territory, the routes converged along the lower Platte River Valley near Fort Kearny, Nebraska Territory and led to rich farmlands west of the Rocky Mountains.
From the early to mid-1830s (and particularly through the years 1846–69) the Oregon Trail and its many offshoots were used by about 400,000 settlers, farmers, miners, ranchers, and business owners and their families. The eastern half of the trail was also used by travelers on the California Trail (from 1843), Mormon Trail (from 1847), and Bozeman Trail (from 1863), before turning off to their separate destinations. Use of the trail declined as the first transcontinental railroad was completed in 1869, making the trip west substantially faster, cheaper, and safer. Today, modern highways, such as Interstate 80 and Interstate 84, follow parts of the same course westward and pass through towns originally established to serve those using the Oregon Trail.
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