Lifestyle Factors Impact Survival of Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma Patients, Mayo Study Finds

May 15, 2019 - Comment

A new study led by researchers from Mayo Clinic in collaboration with six other U.S. institutions has found that patients with non-Hodgkins lymphoma who smoked, consumed alcohol or were obese before their cancer diagnosis had poorer overall survival, compared to patients who did not have these risk factors. This association held after accounting for clinical

A new study led by researchers from Mayo Clinic in collaboration with six other U.S. institutions has found that patients with non-Hodgkins lymphoma who smoked, consumed alcohol or were obese before their cancer diagnosis had poorer overall survival, compared to patients who did not have these risk factors. This association held after accounting for clinical and demographic factors, and also when considering only deaths due to this kind of lymphoma.
For example, non-Hodgkins lymphoma patients with a 20-plus-year history of smoking had a 76 percent higher risk of death compared to never smokers; patients who consumed more than 43 grams of alcohol per week had a 55 percent higher risk of death compared to nondrinkers; and obese patients (defined as a body mass index of 30 or higher) had a 32 percent higher risk of death compared to patients with normal weight for their height.
While smoking and obesity had already been found to increase the risk of developing non-Hodgkins lymphoma, this is the first U.S. study to look at their role on survival after being diagnosed with non-Hodgkins lymphoma, the researchers say. For alcohol, they found that use was associated with poorer survival, which is opposite of the effect for developing non-Hodgkins lymphoma, where alcohol appears to lower risk.
These findings, published in the March 30 online edition of Cancer, mirror conclusions found in three smaller studies, according to the studys lead investigator, James Cerhan, M.D., Ph.D., a Mayo cancer epidemiologist. These are the first data from North American patients, and the only study to simultaneously look at all three lifestyle factors, he says.
To read more, visit: http://newsblog.mayoclinic.org/2010/05/11/lifestyle-factors-and-non-hodgkin-lymphoma-study/
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Comments

HT Parada says:

I support this study. I'm obese. I drink alcohol every day. I have symptoms of lymphoma cancer.

Nancy Palmieri Evans says:

I believe my dlbcl was caused by methotrexate I was taking for an autoimmune disease.

LiL T says:

I'd love to see, more studies of NHL or any kind of cancer patients, who worked around certain chemicals, such as cleaning agents/acids, paint/stain, epoxy, fiberglass, etc., let's say 3-5 days a week for 8-10 years, also, bug spray(the old kind, w/ deets, before finding out that it too caused cancer) on their skin 8-9 months out of the year, for 10-15 years. Plus, those who frequently used these types of chemicals in or around the home, such as RoundUp(I know there are studies for employees, that worked in factories where it was made or landscapers who used it more than the average person), I'm talking about the others, who were exposed to these types of chemicals frequently, like myself, not included in these studies. If there is a study out there, I'd love to hear about it! It seems to be the same old study, over and over again, blaming cancer on one of the "horrible 3".. Smoking, Drinking, or Obesity! My grandfather smoked 2-3 packs a day, drank on occasion, was not obese, and lived to be 90 years old. I've seen others, like him, who did the same, smoked or drank heavily, who lived into their 80's & 90's, then you have another person, who never smoked or drank, then dies of lung cancer at 30 years old. Why? We don't know! I guess what I'm trying to say is, stop putting all the blame on smoking, drinking and obesity. Maybe, try using a little of that research money to look at other possibilities, like the genes of these people.. Something.. Anything.. else besides smoking, alcohol and being overweight! Maybe, if they stopped spraying tobacco with all the pesticides and adding addictive chemicals, cancer wouldn't be as prevalent among smokers?! Then again, what do I know, I'm not a doctor or a scientist?!

LouMarBow LouMarBow says:

Thank you for this video.

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