Image from page 400 of “The call of the dark continent : a study in missionary progress, opportunity and urgency” (1911)

March 11, 2019 - Comment

Image from page 400 of “The call of the dark continent : a study in missionary progress, opportunity and urgency” (1911) Image by Internet Archive Book Images Identifier: callofdarkcontin00walkrich Title: The call of the dark continent : a study in missionary progress, opportunity and urgency Year: 1911 (1910s) Authors: Walker, F. Deaville (Frank Deaville), b.

Image from page 400 of “The call of the dark continent : a study in missionary progress, opportunity and urgency” (1911)
survival ofthe fittest
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: callofdarkcontin00walkrich
Title: The call of the dark continent : a study in missionary progress, opportunity and urgency
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Walker, F. Deaville (Frank Deaville), b. 1878
Subjects: Missions — Africa Methodist Church — Missions
Publisher: London : Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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Text Appearing Before Image:
ibleprevention of the terrible wastage ofhuman life. Before the Christian Powersintervened, the incessant tribal warfare,the slave raiding, the superstitious beliefin witchcraft and magic, human sacrifice,cannibalism, and all the horrible crueltiesof gross heathenism made the DarkContinent a very Golgotha. Now thatthe appalling loss of life from such causeshas been completely stopped over vast areas,and considerably reduced in others, manytribes are increasing in numbers. Andpossibly, through the long night of darkestcruelty, the process of the survival ofthe fittest may have worked for thestrengthening of the physical well-beingof the people.Possibilities of The African races are sometimesthe African thoughtlessly described as inferior ; buta little knowledo^e of them must convincethe impartial observer that the descriptionis erroneous, unjust, and mischievous. Thecorrect view of these peoples is that theyare undeveloped. It has been abundantlyproved that the African is as capable as

Text Appearing After Image:
The Gall of the Hour 333 the average man of any other race. Thetraining may sometimes be a slow andtedious process; the raw native does notquickly develop into a civilised artisan.But we question if the progress made lastcentury by some of the West Coast com-munities, for example, has been exceededelsewhere. Members of the learned pro-fessions—lawyers, doctors, clergy, andministers—are quite numerous, and manyWest African merchants have risen topositions of wealth and influence. Thetrue Sierra Leonian is seldom seen as alabourer. He is found in shops as anindependent trader, or as a clerk in theoffices of European firms, or in someposition under Government. The late Sir Samuel Lewis, K.C.M.G.,was a striking illustration of the capabilitiesof the African. The son of a liberated slavewho had prospered in business, this re-markable man was, as a boy, sent toEngland for education. Passing his ex-aminations with great success, young Lewiswas called to the Bar in 1871 ; he servedthe Sie

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